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20121001
20121031
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KRCB (PBS) 26
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm PDT
revolution -- all of them are citizen journalists. >> he shot this video in the first city taken by the rebels. >> i was responding. i was about 20 inches from the tank. >> in our studio, rudy uses -- explains the technical tricks he has used to protect video on his computer from the prying eyes of eckpnts. he has been to jail three times. he was also tortured and feared for his life. >> maybe i'm the next one who will die in the shelling. but because we try to just let everyone in the world see what the rajiv -- what the regime is doing. we are ready to sacrifice ourselves to the world. >> these are all students who became a citizen journalists before fleeing syria. in paris, they found support from like mines -- mines -- minds. mahomet came to paris 12 years ago. he has been helping syrian refugees since the conflict broke out, providingdocumentati, and consolation. >> when they arrive, they emerged from jail and from being tortured. plus, they no longer have a purpose,ike organizg an filming the resistance to assad. we try to take them in. >> among the compatriots' he has been lo
PBS
Oct 17, 2012 4:30pm PDT
: our coverage of freelancers continues tomorrow in new york city. where they're breaking ground on the first medical facility dedicated to freelance workers. we'll show you why it's not like your typical doctor's office. also tomorrow, some big earnings after the bell, microsoft and google. we'll have results. >> susie: if you watched last night's presidential debate, you heard both president obama and governor romney talk about their efforts to help small businesses. but when it comes to creating jobs, tonight's commentator says not all small businesses are created equal. here's "inc." editor-in-chief, eric schurenberg. >> reporter: you may not have a clue about economics, but if you've been listening to politicians this year, you know one thing: small businesses create jobs. clear the way for mom-and-pop owners and we'll be back at 4% unemployment in no time. only probleis, that's wrong now, small businesses are great, but it should be obvious that putting a dry cleaner or a real estate broker on every corner is not going to save the economy. like big companies, the vast majority
PBS
Oct 7, 2012 1:00pm PDT
port is being spruced up and a museum built, but not much is set to change in the city's in northern districts. >> when the soviet union fell apart, lithuania was the first of the republics to formally declare independence. what followed in the 1990's was a turbulent time politically and economically. lithuania had to make the leap to aarket economy and delop ne sources of ince. the koreans that, for instance, was great for tourism, but a legal fight today shows lithuanians still has a long way to go in its attempt to shake off the coast from its post- soviet past. >> a summer paradise could soon become a nightmare. she practices piano as her parents said in a garden. 10 years ago, the family made her lifelong wish come true. they built a summer home on the crony and spit. now, the wood frame house is to be torn down. authorities say it was built illegally. >> we had all the permits when we bought the house. signatures from every relevant authority -- the notaries and the bank checked it all. we had to get a mortgage using our assets as collateral. five years ago, we suddenly receive
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 10:00pm PDT
evacuating when you've been asked to evacuate, you're putting first responders at danger. >> ifill: on sunday things seemed less urgent for some, taking pictures at ocean city maryland. but by this afternoon, waves were pounding that beach. governor martin o'malley warned of much worse. >> we are ordering and urging all marylanders to stay off the roads for next 36 hours. there are very dangerous conditions out there. we ask you not to put yourselves or your family in jeopardy. >> ifill: norfolk, virginia also had flooding as the storm passed on sunday. in addition a number of states closed schools for at least two days. and canceled was the word of the day for air travel as well. with more than 7,000 flights grounded at east coast airports. >> i really hope that i get to get out of here before the heavy weather hits. i come from florida. so i'm kind of hoping just to get out of the way of the storm. >> ifill: but not everyone managed to get out of the way. the coast guard rescued 14 crew members from a replica tall ship, the h.m.; bounty sailing off cape hatteras north carolina. two w
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 11:00pm PDT
a reporter when i first started, it changed in the mid-'70s with the arab oil embargo, the near bankruptcy of new york city and stagflation, that is inflation and recession at the same time. and all of a sudden business journalism became a front page story. and i saw that i was teaching at columbia at the time i was working at "businessweek" and i saw that happen. the idea of business today. if you had it to do over would you have gone into business or reportg? that's wre younded up. or would you have been more interested in international affairs. more interested in domestic politics? more interests in science? >> i lived and worked in london for a couple years so i had a taste of that and i was national affairs editor of "newsweek" so i had a taste of the politics. i would say that economics and business journalisim in the time that i was doing it was fabulous because we saw the emergence of china and india, we saw the tech revolution. when i became the editor of "businessweek," the chinese were wearing mao suits and the apple macintosh was a novelty and the stock market was a
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 5:30pm PDT
dignity." the emir of qatar made a landmark trip to gaza today. it was the first visit by any head of state since hamas seized control there five years ago. gazans lined the main road to gaza city, as the emir waved at them from his car. he also met with hamas leaders and urged them to reconcile with the rival fatah faction, which rus the wes ban israel maintains a sea blockade of gaza, but qatar has promised to deliver hundreds of million dollars in aid by land route through egypt. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the final presidential debate with a closer look at the arguable statements made by both candidates. margaret warner has our report. >> warner: last night's final presidential debate took on a lo questions. and the answers at times raised further questions. as we did last week, today we reviewed some of what was said anhow itatches the record. starting with mitt romney's charge that from the beginning of his term, president obama was apologizing overseas for america's actions. >> the president began what i've called
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:30pm PDT
tent amid the pregame drilling at the viking football classic between elizabeth city state and sawnt augustine. registering new voters and bringing in actress journey smolet to mix with the crowd. 18-year-old sure petty was fired up by casting her first vote >> everybody is excitedded. everybody's really excited about getting obama in for a second term. >> brown: of course for mitt romney this is perhaps even more a must-win state. he's made numerous visits and republicans insist they won't let things slip away again. b lockwood is communications director for the north carolina g.o.p. >> comparatively from where we were in 2008 to where we are now we've made 20 times the amount of phone calls, more than 100 times the amount of door knocks. over two million voter contacts more than we did in all of 2008 in north carolina. we're doing a great job getting our message out >> brown: one final wild card here the role that social issues might play. in may north carolina voters overwhelming passed a ban on same sex marriage. the very next day president obama announced that he supports
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 11:00pm PDT
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: nancy pelosi is here, she is the minority leader of the house of representatives, she has served in congress for over 25 years, in 2007 became the first female speaker of the house, her commitment toçó democratic politics has made her one of the party's assets as november election approaches, democrats are hopeful they can take back control of the house, i am pleased to have her here back at the table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: you have been driving around, you have been in ten days in ne ys, nine days, tet states, what is it you hear and see out there? i mean i realize and i expect you to say pro democratic party things, but what do you see? >> well, i see strong support for the president. there is really an understanding that in addition to his name being on the ballot and our names being on the ballot that some values are on the ballot that are very important, medicare is on the ballot, it survives in a -- >> rose: it is on the ballot because there is a clear since, fact 35 is a change and vern romy iselected there will be an
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 11:00pm PDT
city, this is charlie rose. city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with polics, governor romney was the clear winner last night in the first of the three presidential debates, his performance revived a campaign dogged by weakening poll numbers a candidate emerged that republicans hoped for, friends often describe but the electorate had yet to encounter. >> that was survey done of small businesses across the country, said what has been the effect of obama care on your hiring plans and three quarters of them said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crisis at the kitchen table and spend his energy and passion for two years fihting for obama care instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> i have my own plans, not the same as simpson-bowles but in my view the president should have grabbed it if he wanted to make adjustments take it, go to congress and fight it. >> that's what we have done, make adjustments and putting it
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:30pm PDT
picked brooklyn for its first medical facility. the number of freelancers in this new york city borough has increased 3,000% in the past decade. david himmelstein is a professor of public health at hunter college, and thinks the clinic is a good idea. his concern is whether the union's insurance plan can survive. >> when you set up an insurance plan and say anyone can join, basically you are likely to attract sick older people who can't get insurance elsewhere in the system. and over the long term, that has doomed similar insurance efforts in the past. >> reporter: but the freelancers union hopes its holistic approach to medicine and emphasis on preventive care will help lower healthcare costs. and that's good for insurance company and patient alike. >> this can really give people the kind of care they need, and it can also be much more economical, so we can make freelancers' dollars go further. >> reporter: if the pilot is successful, the freelancers union hopes to expand to other cities around the country. erika miller, nbr, brooklyn. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we meet a woman who says
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 11:00pm PDT
countryside to the cities in the first five years of this decade. the levels of -- sorry 20 million people. that's more -- that's more than across the atlanti in 100 years for 1920. there's democrat graphic change, there's inequality you look at the princelings are extremely rich and -- >> rose: so is the issue will there be jobs and opportunity when they get to the urban area and will they be able to sustain the economic growth to provide that and if they can't does it unleash a kind of social conflict that will consume -- >> it's both. there are some political reforms you need do with it. you need the issues of taking on thevest interess. >> what you're finding is that there's a war for talent in chinese. difficult for people to stay and work for you. the younger generation in terms of the rural migration, they are not as satisfied as their parents were coming in off the farms and working in a sweatshop. they demand better jobs and so you might say this is a good sweatshop job, it's good as being an indigent labor in the countryside. they're saying no, they can see people with ipa
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm PDT
the japanese war in 1904. nicolai has an eye injury. he has been transported to hospital in the city. at first he closes himself off to the japanese, but tender care from a japanese nurse has his resolve. eventually the two fall in love. the idea for the musical was hatched after a russian gold coin that is more than 100 years old was discovered. the coin was found on the grounds of a hospital where russian prisoners of war were treated. engraved on the coin are the names of a japanese woman and a russian man. research proved these people existed. the woman was a japanese nurse. the man a soldier from russia. the coin appears to be a piece of love between the two. the japanese set of prisoner of war camps during the war. some inmates were free to sickle in the city and bathe in local hot springs because of the locals kind treatment, the prisoners flourished. the actor who plays nicolai visits a russian cemetery before sitting out for moscow. >> translator: the people who are resting here wanted to return to their homeland but could t. they must have felt very sad. i came here to tell
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 5:30pm PDT
city of mingora, in pakistan's swat valley. at a military hospital in peshawar, doctors removed a bullet from her neck. the attack drew worldwide condemnation. speaking at the state department on the first ever international day of the girl, secretary of state hillary clinton said yousufzai is a brave young woman. >> yesterday's attack reminds us of the challenges that girls face, whether it is poverty or marginalization or even violence just for speaking out for their basic rights. >> woodruff: the taliban called the teenager's work an obscenity and pledged to make a new attempt to kill her, if she survives. for more on all of this we turn to "newshour" special correspondent saima mhsin. i oke to her a sho while ago om islamab, pastan. saima mohsin, welcome. first of all, we know the taliban are claiming responsibility. what more do we know about that? >> reporter: yes, the taliban have released a statement accepting responsibility and saying this is because they believe malala yousufzai, this 14-year-old girl from the swat valley, stands for a secular state because she stood up
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 5:30pm PDT
to watch; plus, new clashes in the syrian city of aleppo; the record- breaking sky jump; and the legacy of arlen specter. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: two americans won the 2012 nobel prize in economics today for research on market design and matching. it affects everything from placing doctors in the right hospitals to pairing students with t schls they mostant. e honorees are alvin roth of harvard university, and currently a visiting professor at stanford university, and lloyd shapley, a professor emeritus at the university of california los angeles. wall street had a strong start to the week on news of rising retail sales and better-than- expected earnings at citigroup. the dow jones industrial average gained 95 points to close at 13,424. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3064. a 14-year-old pakistani girl who was shot by a taliban gunman was flown to england today for medical treatment. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: the ambulance drove slowly from birmingham airport. insi
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 4:30pm PDT
change that will lead us back to the same failed policies that crashed our economy in the first place. >> tom: in cities across the u.s., the biggest mortgage lender, wells fargo looking to mend its image after accusations it steered minority homebuyers into sub-prime loans. the bank's strategy is to help certain home buyers with their down payments. as diane eastabook reports cities like chicago are hoping the grants could be a first step in turning around distressed neighborhoods. >> all of you out there probably know what your numbers are. >> reporter: these chicagoans are lining up for what could be a chance of a lifetime. they're applying for $15,000 grants to be used for the purchase of a home. the money is coming from wells fargo and it's part of multi- million dollar national fair lending settlement between the bank, the u.s. justice department, and several states including illinois. >> the programs desire and intent was not only to spark not only the market, but to spark people's imagination to get them interested in buying a home again. >> reporter: the $8 million set
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 11:00pm PDT
establish first in the city before we will extend into a resor. >> us to g a foothold, but, no, they are both viable, they are both part of the company's needs. we must have product of both in most major cities and most countries. >> rose: when you decided to give up the ceo job -- >> well, i -- you know, from day one i have always been in control of my destiny and. >> rose: i prefer that too. >> yes. and that's a privilege. but, you know, it is inevitable and i knew m major responsibility -- well look the company has been my life and it is something i have got my -- everything invested in my life in it. so as every ceo's role is to plan for succession. >> rose: right. >> the expected and the unexpected so i had planned this over many years, i enjoy what i was doing so it wasn't a question of firing the, retiring but i wanted to transition of leadership while i was still hell any and around to be able to assist. >> rose: right. and fortunately, we have got many people who have devoted the better part of their working life, so there was a young lady that started with the company over 20 y
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 4:30pm PDT
to live closer to the city or in the first ring of suburbs. many of them are looking to stay in apartments living rather than having a home further out where they need a car to get any where. they would have more of a mortgage they would be tied into. >> reporter: on the flip side, public spending on construction has fallen sharply. it's down 3.5% from a year ago, as state and local governments tighten their belts. the construction industry is hoping next year will be better for hiring than this one. many u.s. businesses have put projects on hold, due to political uncertainty, and worries about the fiscal cliff. but the most important factor is the economy: >> you might expect that as the housing recoery gets a little bit of pace ov theext ar or so, that should translate into stronger hiring going forward. we are not going to return to levels we were at before the recession, the housing sector is not going to be that big again. but the trend should be up. >> reporter: if construction improves, it's good for the economy as a whole. according to trade association figures, every bi
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 9:00pm PDT
city. the first officer on the flight was ben coats. it was coats' job to calculate the weight limit on the flight, and his calculations showed the plane would be too heavy to fly. and you say to the captain, "captain, we're even more overweight than we thought." what did he say? >> well, he said, "well, why don't we just count three of those adultss children." >> o'brien: really? >> yeah. "just mark them down on the sheet as children, and that will put us underweight." that's what he suggested. >> o'brien: coats says he refused, and the captain took the weight manifest from him. only after landing did coats discover what had happened with the manifest. so, when you looked at the paperwork, which had all the information on the weights and balances for the plane, what did you see? >> well, i saw that it had been altered. my math had been altered. it had been changed so our plane would no longer be overweight. >> o'brien: he made the limit higher so the plane would fit. >> yes. >> o'brien: and what you ended up with was a very heavy aircraft. >> yes, a very hard-to-fly... hard-to-climb, a
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 4:30pm PDT
most deserving of all the city's cultural institutions, and said his grandparents had their first date there. paulson's known for making billions by betting on the collapse of the housing market. >> susie: lovely donation. >> tom: that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 23. good night, susie, and good night, everyone. >> susie: good night, tom. thanks for watching, everyone. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page-- bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 5:30pm PDT
budget; missing from the campaign-- europe's troubles; destruction in an ancient syrian city; and the world's oldest playable recording. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: hurricane "sandy" beat a path across eastern cuba and the bahamas today as a category-2 storm. it's being blamed for at least four deaths so far. "sandy" brought strong surf, heavy rain and winds topping 105 miles an hour, and it ft behind a trail of downed power lines and uprooted trees. the edges of the storm will likely bring tropical storm conditions to southeast florida, and, as it moves north, the mid- atlantic and northeast could also feel the effects through early next week. forecasters are also predicting "sandy" could collide with a blast of arctic air from the north, creating conditions for a super storm along the east coast. a new wave of ethnic violence has erupted across western myanmar, killing at least 56 people. dozens more were wounded in the clashes between buddhists and muslims. the violence re-ignited on sunday in rakhine state, triggering the wors
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 4:30pm PDT
you getting any planes into the metro-new york city area? >> good afternoon. it's a great news story for fedex. we've restarted our air operation into the newark metro area. and, in fct, w were the first jets to land in newark this morning, and since then, we've put over a dozen airplanes into that and j.f.k. >> susie: la guardia is still under water, how that is impacting your operations? >> we don't have scheduled operations into la guardia, we're scheduled in j.f.k. and newark. so we're in good shape in j.f.k., but our people are at work and sorting packages. >> susie: even though the planes are getting in, and the fedex messengers are getting out, there's a lot of that don't have power. how do you know whether you should be delivering a package or not? is this slowing you down? >> it is slowing us down. our team members are affected by the same transportation limit anticipations as everyone else in the region, and our fedex delivery stations are located in the neighborhood in which they deliver, so they have a good sense of what's available to deliver to. fedex also offers a serv
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)